Sunday, May 15, 2011

Kotesol Conference Presentation

My first Kotesol presentation is finished and done.  I was somewhat worried about being able to fill the whole 50 minutes, but as it turns out, Motivation and Reward Systems are topics that everyone seems to have an opinion about, so the 20 or so people added in lots of good thoughts and comments to make for an interactive (and hopefully interesting/helpful) presentation.  There was even a wee bit of drama, with an attender that was somewhat hostile and confrontational.  It all happened right before my time was up so it fizzled out before it even really got started.  Anyway, who knew reward systems could be so controversial?

Here is the power point link that you can check out.  Leave a comment with questions or thoughts (particularly if you were at the presentation). 

6 comments:

MsCaroline said...

This looks really interesting. Have never used 2 truths and a lie in my German classes - will do this! I would love to know what the controversy was about...what was the issue?

Jackie Bolen said...

He thought my motivational reward system amounted to micromanaging/ control freak.

Anyway, I didn't even really have to defend myself since the other attenders did an excellent job of it :)

MsCaroline said...

Oh, I'm glad to hear it! I liked what I saw on your powerpoint. Good ideas. I have been teaching for 20+ years and am always looking for new and better ways to motivate my students. Sounds to me like he was the one with issues. Glad the others stepped up to your defense...

Scott said...

Jackie,

Good job on the presentation last week. I was the guy who commented about the method being slightly immature for college aged students, but after coming back to work on Monday and seeing all of the students without books and paper, I was suddenly reminded of your ideas and the reality of our teaching context. Thus, I'm seriously thinking about implementing your method into my mixed-level/mixed motivation freshman course next semester. I'm hoping it will encourage the learner responsibility that we always hope for, but often fail to see.

Don't worry about the obnoxious dude in the front. He definitely could have stated his methods in a different manner, and the boasting about his uni and the adoration of his students did little to help his cause.

Scott said...

Jackie,

Good job on the presentation last week. I was the guy who commented about the method being slightly immature for college aged students, but after coming back to work on Monday and seeing all of the students without books and paper, I was suddenly reminded of your ideas and the reality of our teaching context. Thus, I'm seriously thinking about implementing your method into my mixed-level/mixed motivation freshman course next semester. I'm hoping it will encourage the learner responsibility that we always hope for, but often fail to see.

Don't worry about the obnoxious dude who responded to your presentation. He definitely could have stated his methods in a different manner, and the boasting about his uni and the adoration of his students did little to help his case.

Jackie Bolen said...

Hey Scott...thanks for stopping by the blog, and for attending the presentation.

When I first started teaching at a Korean uni, I would never have dreamed that my system would actually work. But, I just got so tired of students streaming in late, without book or pencil, or nametag, and then sleeping, talking on their cell-phone or doing other homework in class that I was willing to try anything. Even if it seemed ridiculous!